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OHSS | Office of Homeland Security Statistics

Glossary

The Office of Homeland Security Statistics recognizes the importance of protecting the identity of individuals included in the data used to generate tabulations, reports, and other research. Below is an alphabetical listing of reporting terms, acronyms, and definitions.

Numbers

2-category criminality: Yes/No variable that describes whether or not an individual has previously been convicted of a criminal offense.

3-category criminality: Classifies a noncitizen at the time of an immigration enforcement action as:

  • Convicted Criminal: Immigration Violators with a criminal conviction entered into ICE systems of record at the time of the enforcement action.
  • Pending Criminal Charges: Immigration Violators with pending criminal charges entered into ICE system of record at the time of the enforcement action.
  • Other Immigration Violators: Immigration Violators without any known criminal convictions or pending criminal charges entered into ICE system of record.

4-category criminality: Describes the most serious crime a person has been convicted of as of the date of the query, classifying crimes as aggravated felonies, felonies, or misdemeanors, with "other" indicating no criminal conviction. Reports aggravated felon, felon, misdemeanor, or other based upon the review of all relevant criminal history at the time of the enforcement action and the assessing officer's recorded crime classifications for these criminal charges/convictions.

A

Accompanied minor (AM): An individual younger than 18 years old encountered by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Office of Field Operations (OFO) who is determined to have no lawful immigration status and who is traveling with a U.S. citizen or lawfully admissible noncitizen parent or legal guardian. Accompanied Minor (AM) data are limited to OFO encounters.

Adjustment of status (LPR) (ADJ): A foreign national already present in the United States who becomes a Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR) by filing an application for admission to LPR status with and receiving application approval from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

Administrative encounter: An encounter of an inadmissible noncitizen in which removal proceedings are not considered, including certain withdrawn applications for admission in cases prior to FY 2024 in which expedited removal or other immigration proceedings were not considered, foreign crew members without entry visas who are required to remain aboard their ships, and persons paroled into the United States and released from Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Office of Field Operations (OFO) custody without being placed into removal proceedings.

Administrative return: A return completed by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Office of Field Operations (OFO) resulting from an administrative encounter (see administrative encounter), including withdrawn applications for admission in cases in which expedited removal or immigration proceedings were not considered and foreign crew members without entry visas who are required to remain aboard their ships.

Age: The number of whole years from a person’s date of birth to an event.

Agency: Program office or component within a department; independent governmental entity.

Aggravated felony: Category of criminal offenses listed under 8 USC 1101(a)(43) that, if committed by a noncitizen who is subsequently convicted of such crime(s), precludes the noncitizen from receiving most forms of relief under U.S. immigration law or to be readmitted to the United States at any time in the future.

Agricultural worker: A foreign national coming temporarily to the United States to perform agricultural labor or services, as defined by the Secretary of Labor.

Alien: Terminology in Title 8 of U.S. Code to describe a person who is not a citizen or national of the United States. "Alien" is the term in statute; see noncitizen, foreign national.

Alternatives to detention (ATD): Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) program using technology and other tools to manage unauthorized individual's compliance with release conditions while they are on the non-detained docket.

Apprehension: The arrest of a potentially removable noncitizen by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

Arrest: Act of detaining an individual by legal authority based on an alleged violation of the law.

Arrest, administrative (administrative arrest): Detaining by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) within the interior of the United States of a noncitizen unlawfully present in the United States or of a lawfully present noncitizens who is subject to removal.

Arrest, criminal (criminal arrest): Detaining of an individual based on an alleged criminal offense, which may or may not have a nexus to immigration.

Asylee: Person granted asylum under section 208 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).

Asylum: Form of protection provided to noncitizens physically present in the United States who meet the definition of refugee under Immigration and Nationality (INA) section 101(a)(42) and are not otherwise barred from applying for or receiving asylum.

Asylum, affirmative (affirmative asylum): Process through which a noncitizen who is physically in the United States and not currently in removal proceedings applies for asylum through U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

Asylum, defensive (defensive asylum): Process through which a noncitizen in removal proceedings applies for asylum with an Immigration Judge in immigration court as a defense against removal from the United States.

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B

B1 visa (Business Visitor Visa) (B1): Visa given to a temporary visitor for business.

B2 visa (Tourist Visitor Visa) (B2): Visa given to a temporary visitor for pleasure.

Beneficiary: A noncitizen on whose behalf a U.S. citizen, lawful permanent resident, or employer have filed a petition or application for such noncitizens to receive immigration benefits from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA): The highest administrative body for interpreting and applying immigration laws with nationwide jurisdiction to hear appeals from certain decisions rendered by Immigration Judges and by district directors of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

Bond (immigration): Immigration bonds are primarily issued to release from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody a noncitizen who has been placed in removal proceedings before an Immigration Judge.

Book-in: A book-in is a physical book-in to a detention facility. Multiple book-ins (transfers) can occur within a detention stay.

Book-in, initial (Initial book-in): An initial book-in to a U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention facility is defined as the first time a noncitizen enters ICE custody for a detention stay and does not include transfers between facilities.

Book-out: A book-out is a physical book-out from a detention facility. Multiple book-outs (transfers) can occur within a detention stay.

Book-out, final (Final book-out (CBP)): A U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) final release is defined as a final book-out from custody in a CBP holding facility and then transferred to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody, Alternatives to Detention (ATD) enrollment through ICE, released, repatriated or expelled from the United States.

Book-out, final (Final book-out (ICE)): An Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) final release is defined as a final book-out from a detention stay with ICE that reflects one of the following release reasons: Bonded Out, Order of Recognizance, Order of Supervision, Paroled, or Prosecutorial Discretion.

Border Crossing Card (Border Crossing Identification Card) (BCC): A document of identity valid for 10 years and containing machine-readable fingerprint and other biometric data that is issued to certain noncitizens for the purpose of crossing over the borders between the United States and foreign contiguous territory in accordance with certain conditions and prescribed regulations.

Border location: Refers to one of three U.S. border areas (Maritime, Northern, or Southwestern).

Border Patrol sector: Any one of 20 geographic areas into which the United States is divided for the Department of Homeland Security's Border Patrol activities.

Business nonimmigrant: A foreign national coming temporarily to the United States to engage in commercial transactions which do not involve gainful employment in the United States (i.e., engaged in international commerce on behalf of a foreign firm, not employed in the U.S. labor market, receives no salary from U.S. sources).

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C

Cancellation of removal: A discretionary benefit adjusting a noncitizen's status from that of deportable individual to one lawfully admitted for permanent residence. Application for cancellation of removal is made during the course of a hearing before an immigration judge.

Case priority (refugee): Processing priorities established by the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) that identify individuals and groups who are of special humanitarian concern to the United States and who are eligible for refugee resettlement consideration.

CBP book-out type: The circumstances under which CBP encounters leave CBP custody (e.g., repatriation to Mexico, transfer to ICE, release with an NTA, etc.).

CBP encounter: Any encounter of a removable noncitizen by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Office of Field Operations (OFO) or U.S. Border Patrol (USBP), including the arrest of a removable noncitizen by USBP under Title 8 authority, a determination of inadmissibility for a person requesting admission at a port of entry (land, sea, or air) under Title 8 authority, or an expulsion from the United States to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 disease pursuant to Title 42 authority.

CBP enforcement region: Data on the national immigration enforcement regions encompass four distinct areas, each with its specific area focus: (1) Southwest Land Border: This region concentrates its efforts on immigration enforcement along the U.S.-Mexico border. It encompasses border states such as Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, and portions of California. (2) Northern Land Border: Positioned along the vast U.S.-Canada border, the Northern Land Border region is tasked with immigration enforcement activities in the northern states, including Montana, North Dakota, Minnesota, and others. (3) Maritime Border: The Maritime Border region extends its jurisdiction to U.S. coastal areas and maritime boundaries. It focuses on immigration control within maritime territories, addressing issues related to coastal security, ports of entry, and coastal borders. (4) Interior/Other Airport of Entries: This region encompasses immigration enforcement activities within the interior of the United States, including the oversight of airports of entry not covered by the land or maritime regions.

CBP One appointment: Appointment scheduled via the CBP One™ Mobile Application. The CBP One mobile application enables noncitizens without appropriate documents for admission who seek to travel to the United States through certain southwest border land ports of entry (POEs) the ability to submit information through a module within the application instead of coming directly to wait at a POE.

CBP One arrivals: A noncitizen's arrival at a port of entry scheduled through the CBP One app. Most CBP One arrivals are issued Notice to Appear (NTA)s and paroled into the country, but some are subject to other dispositions.

CBP One opt-ins: The number of noncitizens who have requested an appointment as part of the daily allocation process. Noncitizens can opt-in by accessing their completed registration and requesting an appointment. Noncitizens are limited to one opt-in per day, regardless of whether they have multiple registrations.

CBP One paroles/Notices to Appear at POEs: Noncitizens issued Notice to Appear (NTA)s and paroled into the United States following their arrival at a Southwest (SW) Border port of entry (POE) after registering on the CBP One app.

CBP One registrations: The number of noncitizens who have successfully submitted all their information in advance through CBP One App, including name, date of birth, photo, etc. Once a registration is complete, noncitizens are eligible to request an appointment each day by accessing their registration.

CBP removal: Movement by CBP of an inadmissible or deportable noncitizen out of the United States based on the compulsory execution of an order of removal against the person.

CBP return: Estimated movement by CBP of an inadmissible or deportable noncitizen out of the United States not based on an order of removal, including through voluntary departure, voluntary return, or withdrawal of application for admission.

CDEP: Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, and Peru

Central Index System (CIS): Repository of electronic data and system of record in a legacy mainframe database that contains an index of basic data elements related to an individual passing through the immigration process, plus information on the status of applicants and petitioners seeking immigrant and non-immigrant benefits.

Central Index System 2 (CIS2): A repository of electronic data and system of record in a cloud-based database that contains an index of basic data elements related to an individual passing through the immigration process, plus information on the status of applicants and petitioners seeking immigrant and non-immigrant benefits.

Certificate of citizenship: Identity document proving U.S. citizenship that may be issued to derivative citizens and to persons who acquired U.S. citizenship.

Child (immigration): Generally, an unmarried person under 21 years of age who is: a child born in wedlock; a stepchild, provided that the child was under 18 years of age at the time that the marriage creating the stepchild relationship occurred; a legitimated child, provided that the child was legitimated while in the legal custody of the legitimating parent; a child born out of wedlock, when a benefit is sought on the basis of its relationship with its mother, or to its father if the father has or had a bona fide relationship with the child; a child adopted while under 16 years of age who has resided since adoption in the legal custody of the adopting parents for at least 2 years; or an orphan, under 16 years of age, who has been adopted abroad by a U.S. citizen or has an immediate-relative visa petition submitted in his/her behalf and is coming to the United States for adoption by a U.S. citizen.

CHNV parole: The parole programs that apply to Cuba, Haiti, Nicaragua, and Venezuela (CHNV) that began October 18, 2022 (Venezuela) and January 6, 2023 (Cuba, Haiti, and Nicaragua). In order to qualify for this program, individuals must have a supporter submit an I-134/A on their behalf, be approved by U.S Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), submit additional materials to CBP, pass CBP's security check, receive an advance travel authorization, fly to the United States, and be granted parole by the Office of Field Operations (OFO) at a port of entry. CHNV parolees are eligible to come to the United States for a period of two years and apply for work authorization.

CHNV travel authorization: An advance travel authorization (ATA) is granted in the CHNV parole process after the individual has an I-134/A approved by USCIS, has submitted additional materials to CBP, and has passed a security check by CBP. An ATA allows the individual to travel to the United States for the purposes of being paroled; however, the individual is not automatically granted parole, as parole is granted on a discretionary, case by case basis by Office of Field Operations (OFO) at the port of entry.

Civil Immigration Enforcement Priorities (CIEP): Guidelines establishing civil immigration enforcement priorities for the apprehension, detention, and removal of noncitizens based on them being a threat to national security, public safety, and/or border security.

Class of admission (COA): Refers to a specified single category of admission to a lawful immigration status.

Class of admission, broad or major (broad or major class of admission): Refers to a grouping of one or more specified and similar single categories of admission to a lawful immigration status.

Commuter student: Canadian or Mexican national who resides near the U.S.-Canada or U.S.-Mexico border and commutes into the United States to pursue studies in an approved program in either an academic or a vocational institution within close proximity of one of the two international borders.

Computer Linked Application Information Management System (CLAIMS 3): A legacy U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) case management system and system of record that supports the maintenance and tracking of officer casework documentation for many immigration related requests.

Consequence Delivery System (CDS): Process designed and implemented by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to impede and deter further violations of immigration law by noncitizens by guiding CBP agents and officers through a process designed to uniquely evaluate each subject and identify the most effective and efficient consequences to deliver.

Core Based Statistical Area (CBSA): A statistical geographic entity consisting of the county or counties associated with at least one core (Urban Area) of at least 10,000 population, plus adjacent counties having a high degree of social and economic integration with the core as measured through commuting ties with the counties containing the core. Metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas are the two categories of Core Bases Statistical Area (CBSAs).

Country of birth: Country in which an individual is born.

Country of chargeability: Country to which an immigrant in a numerically limited classification is charged by the U.S. Department of State for purposes of numerical control.

Country of citizenship: A country to which a person owes allegiance and by which they are entitled to be protected. Each country sets its own rules for granting citizenship, which may be based on birth or naturalization, and some persons may not have a country of citizenship.

Country of former allegiance: Previous country of citizenship of a naturalized U.S. citizen.

Country of last residence: Country in which a noncitizen habitually resided prior to crossing the U.S. border and entering the United States.

Country of nationality: Country in which a person has a legal status of membership and is deemed a national.

County: The primary legal divisions of U.S. states and territories and includes “county equivalents” as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau which are considered primary divisions for statistical purposes.

Credible fear: Establishment in a hearing before an Immigration Judge by a noncitizen of a “significant possibility” of having been persecuted or having a well-founded fear of persecution or torture on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion if returned to the noncitizen's country of origin.

Credible fear interview (CFI): Individuals subject to expedited removal who indicate a fear of return to their home country are referred to Asylum Officers for an interview to determine whether they have a credible fear of persecution or torture. The credible fear determination is a screening process, not an adjudication. The asylum officer does not make the final determination as to whether the individual is eligible for a grant of asylum. Individuals found positive for credible fear are placed into §240 removal proceedings where they may apply for asylum or any other benefit for which they may be eligible before an immigration judge. They might be eligible for: Asylum (INA 208) Withholding of removal (INA 241(b)(3)) Withholding of removal under the Convention Against Torture (8 CFR 208.16(c))

Credible fear interview (CFI) results: The outcome of an asylum officer's interview with a noncitizen to determine whether they have a credible fear of return to their country of citizenship or the country in which they last habitually resided. Results may be positive or negative or the case may be administratively closed.

Credible fear review (CFR): An immigration judge's review of a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) asylum officer's determination of whether a noncitizen has a credible fear of return to their country of citizenship or the country in which they last habitually resided.

Credible fear review (CFR) results: An immigration judge's review of a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) asylum officer's determination of whether a noncitizen has a credible fear of return to their country of citizenship or the country in which they last habitually resided. They may either affirm the asylum officer's decision or vacate it.

Crewman: A foreign national serving in any capacity on board a vessel or aircraft.

Criminality: The deportation, exclusion, or removal of a noncitizen who has 1) been charged under a section of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) that requires a criminal conviction and that charge is the basis for the removal or 2) a criminal conviction noted in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) immigration enforcement data systems for a crime that renders the noncitizen removable. A noncitizen with an appropriate criminal conviction is considered a criminal noncitizen regardless of the section of law under which the noncitizen was removed.

Criminal removal: The confirmed removal of a noncitizen with any known previous criminal conviction in the United States.

Custody (CBP): Noncitizens apprehended by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and detained in CBP short-term custody facilities or processing centers (up to 72 hours) for purposes of case processing and disposition, pending transfer to another agency, release, or additional or other actions.

Custody (ICE): Noncitizens detained in Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) civil immigration detention system in furtherance of their removal proceedings or to affect their departure from the United States after a final order of removal from a federal immigration judge.

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D

D-1 nonimmigrant crewmember visa: Nonimmigrant visa for persons working on board commercial sea vessels or international airlines in the United States, providing services required for normal operation and intending to depart the United States on the same vessel or any other vessel within 29 days.

Deferred inspection: Procedure authorized by an immigration inspector when a noncitizen appears at a port of entry with documentation, but after preliminary examination, some question remains about their admissibility which can best be answered at their point of destination.

Deportable person: Noncitizen in and/or admitted to the United States that is subject to a ground(s) of removal specified in section 237 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).

Deportation: The removal or return of a noncitizen from the United States.

Derivative citizenship: Citizenship conveyed to children through the naturalization of parents or, under certain circumstances, to foreign-born children adopted by U.S. citizen parents, provided certain conditions are met.

Detention (ICE): Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detentions are defined as a noncitizen that is physically booked into ICE custody and does not include those under U.S. Marshall custody, Office of Refugee and Resettlement (ORR) custody, or transportation facilities.

DHS administrative return: An estimated movement by Office of Field Operations (OFO) of an inadmissible or deportable noncitizen out of the United States not based on an order of removal, including through voluntary departure, voluntary return, or withdrawal of application for admission. 

DHS enforcement return: The confirmed movement of an inadmissible or deportable noncitizen out of the United States by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) based on a final order of removal; or the estimated return of an inadmissible or deportable noncitizen out of the United States by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) except for voluntary departure, voluntary return, or withdrawal of application for admission.

DHS removal: The confirmed movement of an inadmissible or removable noncitizen out of the United States by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) or Customs and Border Protection (CBP) based on a final order of removal.

DHS removal type: Removals include the confirmed movement of an inadmissible or deportable noncitizen out of the United States by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) based on a final order of removal or the removal of an inadmissible or deportable noncitizen out of the United States by Customs and Border Protection (CBP). Removal types include expedited removal, reinstatement of a previous removal order, and administrative removal.

DHS repatriation: Any departure of an excludable, inadmissible, or removable noncitizen out of the United States based on (1) the compulsory execution of an order of removal against the person under Title 8 authority, (2) a return under Title 8 authority that is not pursuant to an order of removal, or (3) an expulsion from the United States to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 disease pursuant to Title 42 authority.

DHS return: The confirmed movement of an inadmissible or removable noncitizen out of the United States by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) or Customs and Border Protection (CBP) not based on a final order of removal.

DHS transfers to HHS: Unaccompanied children encountered by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and transferred to the care and custody of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

DHS use of force incident: Any incident in which force is used between a DHS Law Enforcement Officer (LEO) and a subject. An incident includes Officer Use of Force, where a DHS LEO uses deadly force, less-lethal intermediate force, or draws a use of force weapon against a subject; Officer Assault, where a subject uses force against a DHS Law Enforcement Officer; and Maritime Vessel Disabling Fire, where a DHS LEO discharges firearms to disable moving vessels or other maritime conveyances. An Officer Assault or Maritime Vessel Disabling Fire may subsequently result in a DHS LEO using force against a subject, in which case the incident is also an Officer Use of Force. An incident may involve one or multiple DHS LEOs using force against one or multiple subjects and vice versa.

Diplomats and other representatives: A foreign national coming temporarily to the United States as a foreign government official, international representative, or North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) official.

Diversity immigrants: Category of persons who obtained Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR) status through the Diversity Immigrant Visa Program, designed to allow immigration from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States, as defined by the Immigration and Nationality Act.

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E

Electronic Immigration System (ELIS): A U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) electronic case management system and system of record for processing electronically filed benefit request forms and certain paper forms.

Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA): Web-based application and screening system used to determine the eligibility of visitors to travel to the United States under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP).

Eligible to naturalize: Refers to persons who may be eligible to become U.S. citizens by applying for naturalization with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and meeting certain legal requirements.

Employer sanctions: A series of civil or criminal penalties for violations under the employer sanctions provision of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 and other legislation, which prohibits employers from hiring, recruiting, or referring for a fee noncitizens known to be unauthorized to work in the United States.

Employment-based preferences: Consist of five categories of workers (and their spouses and children): 1) First preference (EB-1), priority workers; 2) Second preference (EB-2), professionals with advanced degrees or persons of exceptional ability; 3) Third preference (EB-3), skilled workers, professionals with baccalaureate degrees, and unskilled workers; 4) Fourth preference (EB-4), “special” immigrants; and 5) Fifth preference (EB-5), immigrant investors.

Encounters: The sum of U.S. Border Patrol (USBP) Title 8 apprehensions, Office of Field Operations (OFO) Title 8 inadmissibles, and noncitizens processed for expulsions under Title 42 authority by USBP or OFO.

Enforcement encounter: A United States Border Patrol (USBP) encounter, Office of Field Operations (OFO) encounter with a disposition other than those defined as administrative encounters (see administrative encounter), or an encounter resulting in expulsion pursuant to the Centers for Disease Control's (CDC) Title 42 public health order.

Enforcement Integrated Database (EID): A shared common database repository and system of record used by several Department of Homeland Security (DHS) law enforcement and homeland security applications, which stores and maintains information related to the investigation, arrest, booking, detention, and removal of persons encountered during immigration and criminal law enforcement investigations and operations conducted by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), and Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

Enhanced expedited removal processing: A noncitizen in expedited removal proceedings whose credible fear processing is conducted while in Customs and Border Protection (CBP) custody.

Exchange visitor: A foreign national coming temporarily to the United States as a participant in a program approved by the Secretary of State for the purpose of teaching, instructing or lecturing, studying, observing, conducting research, consulting, demonstrating special skills, or receiving training.

Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR): Department of Justice agency whose primary mission is to adjudicate immigration cases, under delegated authority from the Attorney General, through immigration court proceedings, appellate reviews, and administrative hearings.

Expedited removal (ER): An administrative procedure that allows DHS officials to remove certain noncitizens who have entered without inspection or who have committed misrepresentation or fraud without a hearing before an Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) immigration judge.

Expulsion: Noncitizen expelled under Title 42 authority to their country of last transit or, if a person cannot be returned to the country of last transit, to their country of origin (see Title 42).

Event trip - lifecycle: The unit of measurement for the Lifecycle and the Expedited Removal/Credible Fear (ERCF) analyses. Each event trip starts with an initial enforcement action (USBP apprehension, OFO Inadmissibility determination, ERO administrative arrest, or HSI administrative arrest) and proceeds through the system until it ends in either a repatriation, relief from removal, or re-apprehension. It is one completed cycle of enforcement action; the set of reportable events associated with each initial enforcement action. Event Trip ID is assigned whenever a new initial action appears and corresponds with one event trip. Each individual can have multiple Event Trip IDs depending on how many event trips they have completed.

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F

Family-sponsored preferences: Indicates whether the subject of the encounter was an accompanied minor (AM), a family unit individual (FM), a single adult (SA), or an unaccompanied child (UC).

Family status: Indicates whether the subject of the encounter was an accompanied minor (AM), a family unit individual (FM), a single adult (SA), or an unaccompanied child (UC).

Family unit individuals (FM): A noncitizen encountered by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) who belongs to a family unit, defined as one or more minors plus their parent(s) or legal guardian(s) with whom they are traveling; excludes minor children (under the age of 18) traveling with adult family members who are not their parents or legal guardians. All references to family units or FMs are to numbers of individuals in families, not to family groupings.

Fear claim: A claim of fear of return to a noncitizen's country of citizenship while subject to expedited removal, reinstatement of removal, or administrative removal. See "credible fear" and "reasonable fear."

Fear claim at border: Subject of an encounter claimed a fear of return to their country of citizenship after being encountered by a Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer and while in CBP custody.

Fear determination: When an individual is placed in removal proceedings, they are interviewed by USCIS to determine if they have a legitimate fear claim. They can be determined to have a credible or reasonable fear claim, not to have a credible or reasonable fear claim, or the case can be closed.

Fiancé(e) of U.S. citizen: A nonimmigrant coming to the United States to conclude a valid marriage with a U.S. citizen within ninety days after entry.

Field office (CBP OFO): Any one of 20 geographic areas into which the United States is divided for Office of Field Operations (OFO) activities, plus Customs and Border Protection (CBP) preclearance activities abroad.

Field office (USCIS) (USCIS FO): Offices within a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) district that provide services and enforcement functions for a particular portion of the district.

Final enforcement outcome: Includes confirmed repatriations (removals or returns), grants of relief or other forms of protection from removal, findings of non-removability, and Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) re-encounters of aliens believed to have departed the country of their own accord. These events are “final” in that they represent a durable resolution to an initial enforcement action.

Final release: An ICE Final Release is defined as a final book-out that reflects one of the following release reasons: Bonded Out, Order of Recognizance, Order of Supervision, or Paroled.

Fiscal year (FY): The twelve-month period beginning October 1 of the preceding calendar year and ending September 30.

Follow-to-join beneficiary (refugee): A spouse or child who joins the principal refugee more than 4 months after the primary beneficiary's admission to the United States.

Foreign government official: A foreign national coming temporarily to the United States who has been accredited by a foreign government to function as an ambassador, public minister, career diplomatic or consular officer, other accredited official, or an attendant, servant or personal employee of an accredited official.

Foreign information media representative: A foreign national coming temporarily to the United States as a bona fide representative of foreign press, radio, film, or other foreign information media.

Foreign national: Person not a citizen or national of the United States.

Foreign state of chargeability: The independent country to which an immigrant entering under the preference system is credited or charged.

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G

Gender: Gender is a broad term typically associated with a person's own sense of their behaviors, characteristics, and thoughts, often in relation to their sex.

Green Card: Document also known as a Permanent Resident Card, Form I-551, and issued by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to noncitizens as evidence of their lawful permanent resident (LPR) status in the United States.


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H

H-1B beneficiary: Specialty worker whose H-1B petition to work temporarily in the United States has been approved by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) ; such worker is admitted on the basis of professional education, skills, and/or equivalent experience.

H-1B petition: An application form used by employers seeking permission for a foreign national to work temporarily in the United States. An H-1B petition must be approved by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) before a foreign national specialty worker, whether residing overseas or within the United States at the time of application, is authorized to begin or continue working in the United States.

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I

I-94/I-94W: Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Form I-94, Arrival/Departure Record, and DHS Form I-94W, Visa Waiver Arrival/Departure Record, used by most types of nonimmigrants entering the United States to document their arrival and legal presence in the United States. The main categories of nonimmigrants exempted from forms I-94 and I-94W are Mexican citizens with border crossing cards and most Canadian citizens.

I-134 applications: Form I-134 (officially called the “Declaration of Financial Support”) is a form filled out by a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident promising to financially support a specified beneficiary during their time in the United States. Form I-134A, Online Request to be a Supporter and Declaration of Financial Support, is used to request to be a supporter and agree to provide financial support to a beneficiary and undergo background checks as part of Uniting for Ukraine; the Processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans; or the family reunification parole processes. A separate Form I-134/A must be filed for each beneficiary.

I-134 beneficiary: Beneficiary is an individual that receives a benefit. In case of I-134/A, the individual submitting the I-134 is the supporter, as they are submitting the I-134 to financially support a specified beneficiary during their time in the United States. The individual being supported is the beneficiary.

ICE ERO administrative arrest: The physical apprehension of a noncitizen by an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) officer. ICE administrative arrests do not always lead to the noncitizen being detained in ICE custody.

ICE ERO area of responsibility (AOR): Any one of 25 geographical areas (plus Headquarters) in the United States associated with a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) field office within which the field office has the authority to plan and conduct immigration enforcement and removal operations.

Immediate relatives of U.S. citizens: Spouses of U.S. citizens, children (unmarried and under 21 years of age) of U.S. citizens, parents of U.S. citizens at least 21 years old, and certain widow(er)s of U.S. citizens, who are exempt from the numerical limitations imposed on immigration to the United States.

Immigrant: Any person lawfully in the United States who is not a U.S. citizen, U.S. national, or person admitted under a nonimmigrant category as defined by the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) section 101(a)(15).

Immigrant visa: A visa issued by a consular officer outside of the United States to a person eligible to immigrate to the United States to become a lawful permanent resident.

Immigration and Nationality Act (INA): The primary law, codified at U.S. Code Title 8, that governs the immigration, temporary admission, naturalization, and removal of persons who are not citizens or nationals of the United States.

Immigration Judge (IJ): An attorney appointed by the Attorney General to act as an administrative judge within the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) and who is qualified to conduct specified classes of proceedings, including removal proceedings.

Inadmissible noncitizen: Foreign national who has not been inspected and admitted to the United States who is subject to the grounds of removal specified in section 212 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).

Initial Book-ins to ICE detention: An initial book-in into an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) facility during a specific timeframe. Does not include juveniles who are transferred to Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) custody or housed in an ORR facility. U.S. Marshals prisoners are also excluded. Transfers between ICE facilities are not counted as a new detention event, and a noncitizen may be booked into an ICE facility more than one time without triggering a new detention event.

Initial encounter location: Refers to one of three U.S. border areas (Maritime, Northern, or Southwestern) or the U.S. interior where Department of Homeland Security (DHS) may encounter a noncitizen subject to immigration enforcement actions.

Initial enforcement event (initial enforcement action): U.S. Border Patrol (USBP) apprehensions and Office of Field Operations (OFO) inadmissibility determinations. These events are “initial” in the sense that they initiate a process that may lead to a repatriation or to relief/protection from removal.

International representative: A foreign national coming temporarily to the United States as a principal or other accredited representative of a foreign government (whether officially recognized or not recognized by the United States) to an international organization, an international organization officer or employee.

Intracompany transferee: A foreign national, employed for at least one continuous year out of the last three by an international firm or corporation, who seeks to enter the United States temporarily in order to continue to work for the same employer, or a subsidiary or affiliate, in a capacity that is primarily managerial, executive, or involves specialized knowledge.

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Labor certification: Requirement for U.S. employers seeking to employ certain foreign nationals whose admission into the United States is based on job skills or lack of qualified authorized workers in the United States. The Secretary of Labor issues labor certification that attests to the U.S. employers’ needs for such foreign workers.

Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR): Status accorded to an individual who has been lawfully accorded the privilege of residing permanently in the United States as an immigrant in accordance with immigration laws, such status not having changed.

Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR) date: Date when a person was admitted to Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR) status.

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Marital status: Status indicating whether a person is, has been, or has never been married.

Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA): A Core Based Statistical Area associated with at least one Urban Area that has a population of at least 50,000. The Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) comprises the central county or counties containing the core, plus adjacent outlying counties having a high degree of social and economic integration with the central county or counties as measured through commuting.

Mexican Interior Repatriation Initiative (IRI): Program based on joint agreement between the governments of the United States and Mexico to ensure that those repatriated to Mexico are returned closer to their homes in a safe and expeditious manner. Staffed by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)-Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) officers, this program includes flights returning Mexican nationals to their cities of origin, with the goal to have them reintegrate back into their communities, rather than fall victim to human smuggling schemes. Through this program, ICE aims to repatriate large groups of deportees in an efficient, expeditious and humane manner with assistance and coordination from Customs and Border Patrol (CBP).

Micropolitan Statistical Area (µSA): A Core Based Statistical Area associated with at least one Urban Area that has a population of at least 10,000, but less than 50,000. The µSA comprises the central county or counties containing the core, plus adjacent outlying counties having a high degree of social and economic integration with the central county or counties as measured through commuting.

Migrant: A person who leaves his/her country of origin to seek temporary or permanent residence in another country.

Mode of transportation (or transportation mode): Method of travel (air, land, or sea) for persons arriving at ports of entry (POE).

MSRP: The Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of the products seized in U.S. Dollars if the product had been genuine.

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N-400 naturalization: The conferring of citizenship upon a person after birth through approval by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) of the person's naturalization application (USCIS Form N-400).

National (immigration): A person owing permanent allegiance to a state.

NATO official: A foreign national coming temporarily to the United States as a member of the armed forces or as a civilian employed by the armed forces on assignment with a foreign government signatory to NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization).

Naturalization: The conferring by any means of citizenship upon a person after birth.

Naturalization application: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Form N-400, Application for Naturalization, used by a lawful permanent resident to apply for U.S. citizenship.

Naturalization provisions, general (general naturalization provisions): The basic requirements for naturalization that every applicant must meet, unless a member of a special class.

Naturalization provisions, special (special naturalization provisions): Provisions covering special classes of persons whom may be naturalized even though they do not meet all the general requirements for naturalization.

New arrival (LPR): A foreign national living abroad who becomes a Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR) concurrently with admission to the United States at a U.S. port of entry after receiving an immigrant visa from U.S. Department of State (DOS).

No fear removals: Completed expedited removal of a noncitizen with no fear claim.

Noncitizen: Person not a citizen or national of the United States.

Nonimmigrant: Any person in the United States not a U.S. citizen or U.S. national who is admitted on a temporary basis to the United States for a specific purpose under a nonimmigrant category as defined by the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) section 101(a)(15).

Nonimmigrant admission: Lawful entry into the United States of a foreign national under a nonimmigrant class of admission after inspection and authorization by an immigration officer.

Nonimmigrant admission, I-94 (I-94 (nonimmigrant) admission): Lawful entry into the United States of a foreign national under a nonimmigrant class of admission who is required to complete or obtain Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Form I-94 or I-94W.

Nonimmigrant admission, non-I-94 (Non-I-94 (nonimmigrant) admission): Lawful entry into the United States of a foreign national under a nonimmigrant class of admission who is not required to complete or obtain Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Form I-94 or I-94W.

Nonimmigrant visa: A visa properly issued to a person eligible to be admitted as a nonimmigrant to the United States.

Nonpreference category: Category of immigrant visas available to qualified applicants not entitled to a visa under the preference system prior to the Immigration Act of 1990.

Northern Central America or Northern Triangle countries (NCA): El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.

Northern Triangle countries (NTC): El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.

Notice to Appear (NTA): Form I-862, a document that is the first step in starting removal proceedings under Section 240 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). The form identifies the grounds for removal under which the noncitizen is being charged and instructs them to appear before an immigration judge.

Notice to Report (NTR): Form I-385, a document that directs an individual to report to an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) office within 60 days for further immigration processing.

Numerical limit, exempt from: Those noncitizens accorded lawful permanent residence who are exempt from the provisions of the flexible numerical limit of 675,000 set by the Immigration Act of 1990.

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Occupation (immigration): For a noncitizen entering the United States or adjusting immigration status without a labor certification, occupation refers to the employment held in the country of last lawful residence or in the United States. For a noncitizen entering the United States or adjusting immigration status with a labor certification, occupation is the employment for which certification has been issued.

Officer injuries: Describes whether one or multiple officers were injured as a result of a DHS use of force incident where the subject resisted the officer(s). Injuries are categorized into two categories: Yes or No.

OFO administrative encounter: OFO Administrative Encounters are encounters by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Office of Field Operations (OFO) with a noncitizen who is determined to be inadmissible and whose application for admission is terminated without prejudice, who is a crewman refused landing rights or detained on board, or who is granted parole status.

OFO administrative return: An estimated movement by Office of Field Operations (OFO) of an inadmissible or deportable noncitizen out of the United States not based on an order of removal, including through voluntary departure, voluntary return, or withdrawal of application for admission.

OFO enforcement encounter: An encounter by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Office of Field Operations (OFO) with a noncitizen who is determined to be inadmissible except those whose application for admission is terminated without prejudice, who is not a crewman refused landing rights or not detained on board, and who is not granted parole status.

OFO enforcement return: The estimated return of an inadmissible or deportable noncitizen out of the United States by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) except for voluntary departure, voluntary return, or withdrawal of application for admission.

OFO field office: Any one of 21 geographic areas into which the United States, including Customs and Border Protection (CBP) preclearance activities abroad, is divided for Office of Field Operations (OFO) activities.

OFO inadmissibles: List of determinations of inadmissibility made of people unlawfully entering the country at the ports of entry (land, sea, and air).

OFO removal: The movement by Office of Field Operations (OFO) of an inadmissible or removable noncitizen out of the United States based on the compulsory execution of an order of removal against the person.

OFO return: Compulsory movement by Office of Field Operations (OFO) of an inadmissible or removable noncitizen out of the United States not based on an order of removal, including through voluntary departure, voluntary return, or withdrawal of application for admission.

Order of supervision: Condition under which a noncitizen may be released from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody because the field office is unable to obtain a travel document.

Orphan (immigration): For immigration purposes, a child whose parents have died or disappeared, or who has been abandoned or otherwise separated from both parents. An orphan may also be a child whose sole or surviving parent is incapable of providing that child with proper care and who has, in writing, irrevocably released the child for emigration and adoption. In order to qualify as an immediate relative, the orphan must be under the age of sixteen at the time a petition is filed on his or her behalf. To enter the United States, an orphan must have been adopted abroad by a U.S. citizen (and spouse, if married) or be coming to the United States for adoption by a citizen.

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Parole, advance (advance parole): Parole authorized in advance of an inadmissible noncitizen's arrival or for foreign nationals residing in the United States in other than lawful permanent resident status who need to travel and return and whose conditions of stay do not otherwise allow for readmission to the United States if they depart.

Parole (CBP): Discretionary permission granted to an otherwise inadmissible noncitizen to temporarily enter the United States due to an emergency and urgent humanitarian reason or significant public benefit.

Parolee: A noncitizen, appearing to be inadmissible to the inspecting officer, allowed into the United States for urgent humanitarian reasons or when that noncitizen's entry is determined to be for significant public benefit. Parole does not constitute a formal admission to the United States and confers temporary status only, requiring parolees to leave when the conditions supporting their parole cease to exist.

Parole, humanitarian (humanitarian parole): Parole authorized for "urgent humanitarian reasons" as specified by law, regulation, or declaration by the U.S. government.

Parole, I-94/ATD (I-94 parole-ATD): Noncitizens paroled into the United States by Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) and enrolled in an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) alternatives to detention (ATD) program prior to their release.

Parole (ICE): Temporary status granted to a noncitizen for release from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody due to humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit or because the noncitizen has made a claim for asylum and has been found to have a credible fear of persecution or torture if returned to his/her country of origin.

Parole in place (USCIS): Parole in place allows a noncitizen, who came into the United States without authorization by an immigration officer, to stay for a certain period of time and is granted on a case-by-case basis for humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit.

Parole, overseas (overseas parole): Parole authorized by Department of Homeland Security (DHS) while the noncitizen is still overseas; designed to constitute long-term admission to the United States. In recent years, most of the noncitizens the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has processed through overseas parole have arrived under special legislation or international migration agreements.

Parole, port-of-entry (port-of-entry parole): Parole authorized at the port upon noncitizen's arrival; used at the discretion of the supervisory immigration inspector, usually to allow short periods of entry, and applies to a wide variety of situations, such as allowing noncitizens who could not be issued the necessary documentation within the required time period, or who were otherwise inadmissible, to attend a funeral and permitting the entry of emergency workers, such as fire fighters, to assist with an emergency.

Parole, public interest (public interest parole): Parole authorized at Department of Homeland Security (DHS) headquarters for "significant public benefit" specified in the law; generally used for noncitizens who enter to take part in legal proceedings.

Per-country limit: The maximum number of family-sponsored and employment-based preference visas that can be issued to citizens of any country in a fiscal year.

Petitioner application confirmed: Confirmed filers of I-134A online requests to be a supporter and declaration of financial support for sponsors of individuals under the Family Reunification Parole Process.

Port of entry (POE): Any location in the United States or its territories that is designated as a port of entry (POE) for noncitizens and U.S. citizens.

Preference system (Immigration Act of 1990): The nine categories since fiscal year 1992 among which the family-sponsored and employment-based immigrant preference visas are distributed.

Pre-inspection: Complete immigration inspection of airport passengers before departure from a foreign country. No further immigration inspection is required upon arrival in the United States other than submission of Form I-94/I-94W for persons arriving as nonimmigrants.

Principal applicant: The person who applies for immigrant status and from whom another foreign national may derive lawful status under immigration law or regulations (usually spouses and minor unmarried children).

Priority 1 (P-1) refugee: Individuals referred by the United Nations High Commission on Refugees (UNHCR), a U.S. Embassy, or certain non-governmental organizations (NGOs) for refugee resettlement consideration.

Priority 2 (P-2) refugee: Groups of special humanitarian concern for refugee resettlement consideration.

Priority 3 (P-3) refugee: Family reunification cases for refugee resettlement consideration.

Prosecutorial discretion (PD): Prosecutorial Discretion (PD) is the authority of a law enforcement agency to decide where to focus its resources and whether or how to enforce the law against an individual.

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Reasonable fear: A “reasonable possibility” an individual would be persecuted or subject to torture in the future on account of their race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion if returned to their country of origin. The reasonable fear screening process is triggered when an individual subject to final administrative removal or reinstatement of removal expresses to an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) or Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) officer a fear of returning to the country to which they have been ordered removed.

Reasonable fear interview: In order to comply with international obligations under the Refugee Convention and the Convention Against Torture, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Asylum Division screens certain individuals who are not eligible for any form of relief from removal. These individuals are: • Individuals subject to reinstatement of a prior removal order under INA § 241(a)(5), or • Individuals who are not lawful permanent residents (LPRs) and have been ordered removed under INA § 238(b) because of a conviction of an “aggravated felony” (“final administrative removal"). The reasonable fear process is triggered when an individual subject to final administrative removal or reinstatement of removal expresses to an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) or Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer a fear of returning to the country to which they have been ordered removed. Such circumstances require the officer who issues the removal order to refer the case to an asylum office for a reasonable fear determination. The reasonable fear determination is a screening process, not an adjudication. The asylum officer does not make the final determination as to whether the individual is eligible for a grant of withholding of removal. Individuals found positive for reasonable fear are placed into withholding only proceedings before an immigration judge to see if removal should be withheld or deferred from the country of removal due to persecution or torture.

Recognizance (ICE release condition): Condition under which a noncitizen who is not subject to a final order of removal may be released from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody because they are not a detention priority.

Refugee: Status granted to an individual, prior to departure for and arrival in the United States, who has been determined by competent authority to be fleeing persecution or have a well-founded fear of persecution in their own country because of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or political opinion.

Refugee approvals: The number of refugees approved for admission to the United States during a fiscal year by Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officers in overseas offices.

Refugee arrivals: The number of refugees Department of Homeland Security (DHS) initially admits to the United States through ports of entry during a fiscal year.

Refugee authorized admissions: The maximum number of refugees allowed to enter the United States in a given fiscal year. As set forth in the Refugee Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-212) the President determines the annual figure after appropriate consultation with Congress.

Refugee resettlement: Permanent relocation of refugees in a place outside their country of origin to allow them to establish residence and become productive members of society there. Refugee resettlement in the United States is accomplished with the direct assistance of private voluntary agencies working with the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR).

Region: One of eight continental or subcontinental areas (excluding Antarctica) that includes multiple countries; regions are Africa, Asia, Caribbean, Central America, Europe, North America (including or excluding Caribbean and Central America), Oceania, and South America.

Region of birth: World region in which an individual is born.

Region of chargeability: World region to which an immigrant in a numerically limited classification is charged by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) for purposes of numerical control. For refugees, any one of five regions-Africa, East Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, Near East and South Asia, and the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe-into which the world is divided for the initial admission of refugees to the United States.

Region of citizenship: World region in which a person is born or naturalized and to which the person owes allegiance and by which he or she is entitled to be protected.

Relation to principal applicant: Refers to principal applicant (self) or the type of familial connection between the principal applicant and a person who derives a benefit from such a relationship.

Removal: The compulsory and confirmed movement of an inadmissible or removable noncitizen out of the United States based on an order of removal. A noncitizen who is repatriated pursuant to a removal order has administrative or criminal consequences placed on subsequent reentry owing to the fact of the removal. DHS removals include removals completed by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) and those completed by Customs and Border Protection (CBP). Note that ICE's public reporting on removals completed by ICE/ERO also includes returns completed by ICE/ERO (see "return").

Removal order (order of removal): Order issued by a U.S. immigration official to remove a noncitizen from the United States.

Repatriations, total: The sum of Title 8 removals, Title 8 returns, and Title 42 expulsions of noncitizens to their country of citizenship or a third country.

Repeat encounter (CBP): Refers to a noncitizen encountered by Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) more than once within the previous 12 months.

Return: Compulsory and confirmed movement of an inadmissible or removable noncitizen out of the United States not based on an order of removal (see "removal"). Returns include voluntary departures, voluntary returns, withdrawals of applications for admission, and crew members without entry visas who are required to remain aboard their ships. Also see "administrative return" and "enforcement return."

Return (noncitizen returned): Confirmed movement of a potentially inadmissible or deportable noncitizen out of the United States not based on an order of removal, but through either voluntary departure or voluntary return.

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Service centers (USCIS) (SC): The Service Center Operations Directorate (SCOPS) has five service centers that process and adjudicate certain immigration applications and petitions. Service centers do not provide in-person services, conduct interviews, or receive walk-in applications, petitions, or questions. They work only on certain applications or petitions that applicants have mailed, filed online, or filed with a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Lockbox.

Sex: Biological forms described as male or female. Unknown sex indicates instances where sex cannot be determined or was not recorded.

Single adults (SA): A noncitizen encountered by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) who is at least 18 years of age and not part of a family unit.

Single minors: Individuals under 18 encountered without an adult family member who were encountered and expelled under Title 42 authority.

Special agent in charge jurisdiction (ICE HSI) (SAC): Any one of 30 geographical areas in the United States plus those areas abroad associated with an Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations' (HSI) Special Agent in Charge (SAC) office within which the office is responsible for the administration and management of all ICE HSI investigative and enforcement activities.

Special immigrant (SI): Certain categories of Legal Permanent Residents (LPR) who were exempt from numerical limitation before fiscal year 1992 and subject to limitation under the employment-based fourth preference beginning in 1992.

Special Immigrant Visa (SIV): A visa properly issued by a consular officer outside of the United States to a person eligible to immigrate to the United States to become a lawful permanent resident under a special immigrant class of admission (COA).

Stateless: Not considered as a national by any State under the operation of its law.

State or territory: One of the 50 states of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, or any territorial possession of the United States.

State or territory of destination: One of the 50 states of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, or any territorial possession of the United States to which a person travels.

State or territory of residence: One of the 50 states of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, or any territorial possession of the United States in which a person has taken up residence and habitually resides.

Stowaway: A noncitizen who obtains transportation without the consent of the owner, charterer, master or person in command of any vessel or aircraft through concealment aboard such vessel or aircraft in order to come into the United States surreptitiously and without obtaining lawful status of admission.

Student (nonimmigrant): A foreign national coming temporarily to the United States to pursue a full course of study in an approved program in either an academic (college, university, seminary, conservatory, academic high school, elementary school, other institution, or language training program) or a vocational or other recognized nonacademic institution.

Subject to the numerical limit (immigration): Categories of lawful immigrants subject to annual limits under the provisions of the flexible numerical limit of 675,000 set by the Immigration Act of 1990.

Successful unauthorized entries: The estimated number of inadmissible noncitizens who improperly enter the United States, including those who enter without inspection between ports of entry and those who enter fraudulently or without inspection through ports of entry (POE).

Supporter applications confirmed: Confirmed filers of I-134A online requests to be a supporter and declaration of financial support for sponsors of individuals under the CHNV parole process.

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Temporary Protected Status (TPS): Temporary Protected Status (TPS) allows certain eligible nationals of a foreign state to apply for temporary refuge in the United States after a finding that conditions in that country pose a danger to personal safety due to ongoing armed conflict or an environmental disaster.

Temporary visitor for business: A foreign national coming temporarily to the United States to engage in commercial transactions which do not involve gainful employment in the United States, (i.e., engaged in international commerce on behalf of a foreign firm, not employed in the U.S. labor market, and receives no salary from U.S. sources).

Temporary visitor for pleasure: A foreign national coming temporarily to the United States for tourism or other non-business purposes.

Temporary worker: A foreign national coming to the United States to work for a temporary period of time.

Title 42 (T42): Title 42 of the United States Code, which includes provisions related to public health. Border encounters processed under a March 2020 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) order pursuant to Title 42 are expelled from the United States as expeditiously as possible in the interest of U.S. public health to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 disease.

Title 42 expulsion: U.S. Border Patrol (USBP) or Office of Field Operations (OFO) encounter expelled from the United States as expeditiously as possible in the interest of U.S. public health to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 disease pursuant to the March 2020 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) order under Title 42 authority. Title 42 expulsions occurred between March 20, 2020, and May 11, 2023.

Title 8 (T8): Title 8 of the United States Code, which includes most provisions for immigration enforcement. Encounters processed under Title 8 authority may be subject to removal from the United States.

Title 8 repatriations: The sum of Title 8 removals (see "removal") and Title 8 returns (see "return"). This does not include noncitizens expelled pursuant to the Centers for Disease Control's (CDC) Title 42 order (see "Title 42 expulsion").

Title authority: The Title within the United States Code that provides the legal authority to process noncitizens for exclusion or removal. See Title 8 and Title 42.

Transfer: A transfer is a book-out from one detention facility followed by a book-in to another detention facility within a detention stay.

Transit individual: A foreign national in immediate and continuous transit through the United States, with or without a visa, including, 1) persons who qualify as persons entitled to pass in transit to and from the United Nations Headquarters District and foreign countries, 2) foreign government officials and their spouses and unmarried minor (or dependent) children in transit.

Treaty trader or investor (immigration): A foreign national coming to the United States, under the provisions of a treaty of commerce and navigation between the United States and the foreign state of such person, to carry on substantial trade or to direct the operations of an enterprise in which he/she has invested a substantial amount of capital.

Type of admission (LPR): One of two paths to Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR) status, depending on whether a person applies for an immigrant visa abroad (New Arrival) or seeks LPR status from within the United States (Adjustment of Status).

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Unaccompanied children (UC): Individuals younger than 18 years old encountered by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) under Title 8 authority who are determined to have no lawful immigration status and who either do not have a parent or legal guardian in the United States or do not have a parent or legal guardian in the United States who is available to provide care and physical custody.

Unauthorized immigrant population: The unauthorized immigrant population is defined as all foreign-born non-citizens who are not legal residents, including naturalized citizens, persons granted lawful permanent residence, persons granted asylum, persons admitted as refugees, and persons admitted as resident nonimmigrants (i.e., students and temporary workers, as opposed to tourists) who have unexpired authorized periods of admission. Most unauthorized immigrants either entered the United States without inspection or were admitted temporarily and remained past the date they were required to depart.

Unique encounter (CBP): Noncitizen who has been encountered by Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) only once within the previous 12 months.

Unique individual (nonimmigrant): Refers to a person admitted one or more times into the United States under a nonimmigrant class of admission within a defined period of time.

USBP apprehension: The arrest of a removable noncitizen by U.S. Border Patrol (USBP) under Title 8 authority. Persons who are apprehended may be administratively removed or returned by USBP or placed in removal proceedings, among other outcomes.

USBP removal: Estimated movement by U.S. Border Patrol (USBP) of an inadmissible or removable noncitizen out of the United States based on the compulsory execution of an order of removal against the person.

USBP sector: Any one of 20 geographic areas into which the United States is divided for Customs and Border Protection (CBP) U.S. Border Patrol (USBP) activities.

USCIS negative near review: When an individual is encountered between ports of entry and claims fear during expedited removal proceedings, they are interviewed by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to determine if they have a legitimate fear claim. If the individual is determined not to have a credible fear claim, and referred to an immigration judge (IJ) for review at the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR), the case moves forward with EOIR.

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Visa Waiver Program (VWP): The VWP allows citizens of certain selected countries to travel temporarily to the United States under the nonimmigrant admission classes of visitors for pleasure and visitors for business, to enter the United States without obtaining nonimmigrant visas, and to be admitted for no more than 90 days.

Voluntary departure: The departure of a noncitizen from the United States without an order of removal and may or may not have been preceded by a hearing before an immigration judge. A noncitizen allowed to voluntarily depart concedes removability but does not have a bar to seeking admission at a POE at any time. Failure to depart within the time granted results in a fine and a
10-year bar to several forms of relief from deportation.

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Wet Foot – Dry Foot policy: The “Wet Foot – Dry Foot” policy exempted certain Cuban nationals from the provisions of INA Section 235(b)(1) and allowed them to remain in the United States if they reached U.S. soil. Since the end of this policy on January 12, 2017, all Cuban nationals entering without proper documentation are subject to removal.

Withdrawal: An arriving noncitizen's voluntary retraction of an application for admission to the United States and immediate departure from the United States in lieu of a removal hearing before an immigration judge or an expedited removal.

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Years before naturalization: Number of whole years a person was in lawful permanent resident (LPR) status before naturalization.

Years in LPR status: Number of whole years a person has been in lawful permanent resident (LPR) status.

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Zip code: U.S. ZIP codes are a type of postal code used within the United States to help the United States Postal Service (USPS) route mail more efficiently. The 5-digit number represents a geographic mail delivery area for USPS and is the first part of a Delivery point code.

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